in a vacuum all electromagnetic waves have the same


in a vacuum all electromagnetic waves have the same speed, but in a medium like air or water, the speed of waves depends on the frequency.

The speed of waves in a medium varies depending on the properties of that medium. For example, sound waves travel more slowly through denser media such as water or steel than they do through less dense media such as air. Similarly, light waves travel more slowly through denser media such as glass than they do through less dense media such as air.

The speed of an electromagnetic wave also depends on its frequency. Higher-frequency waves travel faster than lower-frequency waves. This is why radio waves can travel long distances: their low frequency makes them relatively slow, so they can be easily absorbed and redirected by objects in their path (such as mountains and buildings).

The speed of light in a vacuum is always the same, but in a medium like air or water, the speed of light depends on the frequency. Higher-frequency waves travel faster than lower-frequency waves. This is why blue light bends more than red light when it passes through a prism: blue light has a higher frequency than red light, so it travels faster and is bent more by the prism.

in a vacuum all electromagnetic waves have the same

One consequence of the fact that higher-frequency waves travel faster than lower-frequency waves is that information can be transmitted at different speeds depending on the frequency of the signal. For example, FM radio signals are transmitted at much higher frequencies than AM radio signals, so they can carry more information per second and are less susceptible to interference