Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the resistivities ρ1 to ρ5 of these wires


Rank in order, from largest to smallest, the resistivities ρ1 to ρ5 of these wires.

1) The resistance of a metal conductor is inversely proportional to its cross-sectional area. The larger the cross-sectional area of the conductor, the smaller the resistance.

2) The resistance of a metal conductor is directly proportional to its length. That is, the longer the conductor, the greater the resistance.

3) The resistance of a metal conductor increases as its temperature increases.

4) The resistance of a metal conductor decreases as its temperature decreases.

From the above, we can see that the resistance of a metal conductor is greatest at high temperatures and shortest at low temperatures. Therefore, the order from largest to smallest would be high temperature, long conductor, and low temperature.

rank in order, from largest to smallest, the resistivities ρ1 to ρ5 of these wires.

The resistivity of a wire is inversely proportional to its cross-sectional area.

  1. ρ1 = 1/A1
  2. ρ2 = 1/A2
  3. ρ3 = 1/A3
  4. ρ4 = 1/A4
  5. ρ5 = 1/A5

where A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5 are the cross-sectional areas of the wires, from largest to smallest.

Therefore, the resistivities of the wires, from largest to smallest, are:

  1. ρ5 = 1/A5
  2. ρ4 = 1/A4
  3. ρ3 = 1/A3
  4. ρ2 = 1/A2
  5. ρ1 = 1/A1

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